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Modest, open-plan family kitchen with walnut cabinetry, central island and oak floors

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/43637 The warmth of wood meets the cool of pristine white surfaces in this bright, breezy, and welcoming upstairs family kitchen. Roomy kitchen achieved in limited space – several factors contributed. Architect Lindy Small discusses the approaches taken to achieve this. As the hub of the modern home, the kitchen has to be light, welcoming, and offer plenty of room to move. However, when available space is limited, the options include borrowing from nearby areas or evoking a sense of spaciousness through color and tone. For this contemporary kitchen, architect Lindy Small followed both these design paths. Originally, this house, with spectacular views of the bay, was dark and broken into small rooms with an inefficient circulation flow, says Small. “As part of the wider remodel, the owners wanted a large, open-plan living space with an airy presence. So there had to be plenty of natural light and adequate cross ventilation.” Small gained additional space for the new kitchen in two ways. First, a double height void, rising from the level below, was floored over – freeing up a corner of the room. Second, the architect removed two constraining walls between the kitchen and dining volumes. “We added large windows at the rear of the kitchen, a corner window in the dining area and enhanced the indoor-outdoor flow. In another move, we raised the ceiling in both areas and installed ash panels on the living room ceiling. This evokes a more formal feel,” says Small. The sense of space was optimized in other ways, too. A food pantry, extensive storage and most appliances are contained in a single large cabinet volume set to one side of the kitchen. “Setting the cabinetry to one side, as one block, keeps the heart of the kitchen clutter-free. It also means daylight from the rear windows penetrates right through into the living spaces.” A warm, natural palette and contrasting colors add to the generous feel. The substantial side cabinet is in European walnut, while the living room cabinetry is in a similar but lighter species, zebrawood, which also features in other areas of the home. The darkly grained walnut surfaces anchor the floor-to-ceiling kitchen cabinet, and the finish offers a dramatic juxtaposition to the gleamingwhite surfaces on the perimeter cabinets and island. This contrast makes the kitchen seem even lighter, and so bigger. The island bar and oak floors extend the warm wood tones. The stairs were also remodeled as part of the project. In another space-saving move, Small designed built-in zebrawood casework that doubles as furniture and a stair guardrail. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44846

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A white kitchen doesn’t have to be boring - just add splashes of color and designer light fixtures

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44368 Contemporary white kitchen with rail and stile doors, subway tiles, modern lighting. White kitchens are always popular - but they don’t have to be stark and clinical. Interior designer Renae Keller talks to Trends editorial director Paul Taylor. White kitchens help to create a crisp, clean look for a family living area. But that’s often where any similarity between white kitchens ends. And the reason is simple – white is the perfect backdrop for a variety of color accents that may be introduced through materials, products or accessories. For example, this family kitchen by designer Renae Keller avoids a sterile, all-white look through the innovative use of color and form. Keller says the kitchen, which is in a new house, needed to have a modern, clean-lined look to complement the contemporary architecture. “An all-white kitchen would have been too stark, however,” the designer says. “So we introduced a subway tile backsplash in a warm putty color, with a crackle glaze. This has a little more of a traditional feel, yet it works with the classic, square-edged design of the cabinetry.” Keller says rail and stile doors on the cabinets also help to soften the look, so it is neither too clinical nor too ornate. But it is the finishing touches that really raise the kitchen out of the ordinary. Two sculptural LZF light fixtures featuring a ribbon-like wood veneer pigmented in a gray shade are suspended above the island. The dining table is also highlighted – by a Bocci pendant light comprising 14 borosilicate glass globes. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44369

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Large transitional kitchen design has two islands and a mix of white, taupe and dark colors.

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44880 Remodeled kitchen in white and dark-stained maple wood has subtle French influence. Two islands and a balance of light and dark colors help this remodeled kitchen fit neatly into a large space. Trends editorial director Paul Taylor talks to designer Janice Teague of Drury Design. Even in a home that’s a little traditional, an overly ornate kitchen can seem out of place today – highly decorative crown mouldings and corbels don’t always fit with modern family lifestyles. The original kitchen in this house was a case in point, says designer Janice Teague CKD, CBD of Drury Design Kitchen & Bath Studio, who was commissioned to design a new kitchen for the owners. “It had a very traditional styling and included a gazebo-like structure with columns in the middle of the room. This took up space and interrupted the flow of the kitchen. The cabinetry also looked tired and was starting to come apart.” Teague says the owners wanted a fairly simple, clean-lined kitchen that would be more open, yet not overly modern. “The house has a relatively traditional, slightly French look, which influenced the design. The huge size of the kitchen was another factor – this led to the idea of two large, square islands, one to be a workstation for the owner, who is a trained chef, and the other for entertaining, casual dining and homework. A suspended cloud ceiling also helps to break up the space. Lighting within this ceiling avoids the need for extra pendants, which would have blocked the view down the kitchen.” The designer says the material palette evolved as the design progressed. The team started with white cabinetry, and added dark wood accents that help to anchor the space visually. “We then brought in a third color for the islands – a soft taupe that provides a nice transition between the very light and very dark. This makes the room blend more harmoniously. The door style also helps – the stile and rail design with a bead applied moulding is a little softer than a traditional Shaker style.” Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44881

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Large transitional kitchen design has two islands and a mix of white, taupe and dark colors.

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44880 Remodeled kitchen in white and dark-stained maple wood has subtle French influence. Two islands and a balance of light and dark colors help this remodeled kitchen fit neatly into a large space. Trends editorial director Paul Taylor talks to designer Janice Teague of Drury Design. Even in a home that’s a little traditional, an overly ornate kitchen can seem out of place today – highly decorative crown mouldings and corbels don’t always fit with modern family lifestyles. The original kitchen in this house was a case in point, says designer Janice Teague CKD, CBD of Drury Design Kitchen & Bath Studio, who was commissioned to design a new kitchen for the owners. “It had a very traditional styling and included a gazebo-like structure with columns in the middle of the room. This took up space and interrupted the flow of the kitchen. The cabinetry also looked tired and was starting to come apart.” Teague says the owners wanted a fairly simple, clean-lined kitchen that would be more open, yet not overly modern. “The house has a relatively traditional, slightly French look, which influenced the design. The huge size of the kitchen was another factor – this led to the idea of two large, square islands, one to be a workstation for the owner, who is a trained chef, and the other for entertaining, casual dining and homework. A suspended cloud ceiling also helps to break up the space. Lighting within this ceiling avoids the need for extra pendants, which would have blocked the view down the kitchen.” The designer says the material palette evolved as the design progressed. The team started with white cabinetry, and added dark wood accents that help to anchor the space visually. “We then brought in a third color for the islands – a soft taupe that provides a nice transition between the very light and very dark. This makes the room blend more harmoniously. The door style also helps – the stile and rail design with a bead applied moulding is a little softer than a traditional Shaker style.” Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44881

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Modest, open-plan family kitchen with walnut cabinetry, central island and oak floors

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/43637 The warmth of wood meets the cool of pristine white surfaces in this bright, breezy, and welcoming upstairs family kitchen. Roomy kitchen achieved in limited space – several factors contributed. Architect Lindy Small discusses the approaches taken to achieve this. As the hub of the modern home, the kitchen has to be light, welcoming, and offer plenty of room to move. However, when available space is limited, the options include borrowing from nearby areas or evoking a sense of spaciousness through color and tone. For this contemporary kitchen, architect Lindy Small followed both these design paths. Originally, this house, with spectacular views of the bay, was dark and broken into small rooms with an inefficient circulation flow, says Small. “As part of the wider remodel, the owners wanted a large, open-plan living space with an airy presence. So there had to be plenty of natural light and adequate cross ventilation.” Small gained additional space for the new kitchen in two ways. First, a double height void, rising from the level below, was floored over – freeing up a corner of the room. Second, the architect removed two constraining walls between the kitchen and dining volumes. “We added large windows at the rear of the kitchen, a corner window in the dining area and enhanced the indoor-outdoor flow. In another move, we raised the ceiling in both areas and installed ash panels on the living room ceiling. This evokes a more formal feel,” says Small. The sense of space was optimized in other ways, too. A food pantry, extensive storage and most appliances are contained in a single large cabinet volume set to one side of the kitchen. “Setting the cabinetry to one side, as one block, keeps the heart of the kitchen clutter-free. It also means daylight from the rear windows penetrates right through into the living spaces.” A warm, natural palette and contrasting colors add to the generous feel. The substantial side cabinet is in European walnut, while the living room cabinetry is in a similar but lighter species, zebrawood, which also features in other areas of the home. The darkly grained walnut surfaces anchor the floor-to-ceiling kitchen cabinet, and the finish offers a dramatic juxtaposition to the gleamingwhite surfaces on the perimeter cabinets and island. This contrast makes the kitchen seem even lighter, and so bigger. The island bar and oak floors extend the warm wood tones. The stairs were also remodeled as part of the project. In another space-saving move, Small designed built-in zebrawood casework that doubles as furniture and a stair guardrail. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/44846

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Contemporary kitchen design - flexible use of space

This loft condominium has multiple uses - corporate accommodation, meeting room and entertainment space. Trends editorial director Paul Taylor looks at how Interior designer Tom Stringer achieved all that. Corporate entertaining is relaxed in this remodeled condominium, where a flexible design maximizes all the available space. One of the key elements in today's homes is flexibility - both flexibility in design and flexibility in the way a space can be used. This remodeled loft condominium is a good example of how that can pan out. It's designed by interior designer Tom Stringer to be flexible in its use -- as an apartment for corporate guests ... a retreat for meetings ... and an entertainment space. Stringer's design of the kitchen shows how you can create something that's cost-effective, without sacrificing good design. The gloss finished cabinets come from Ikea and have been teamed with white quartz and recycled glass countertops ... metallic mirror glass tiles on the backsplash ... and stainless steel shelving. Because the space is multiuse, the client wanted to be able to screen off the kitchen, yet not completely close it off. Stringer's solution was the sheer drape that can be pulled across all or part of the island - muting the activity behind ...while still allowing light through. Even the dining table contributes to the flexibility of the design. On a simple level, it also doubles as a meeting table -- video conferencing facilities are stored in the console below the television. But when work is over, it converts to a pool table - using gas struts in the legs to easily raise and lower the top to the required height. And the room now converts to an entertainment space. Video: http://my.trendsideas.com/#/search/43614 Read the full article at: http://my.trendsideas.com/#/search/43612

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