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Arup satellite office space in downtown LA designed by Zago Architecture for activity-based working

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/search/46534 Arup satellite office in downtown LA by Zago Architecture designed for activity-based work, with a variety of desks, seating, collaborative hubs, sustainable design. Change in the workplace is not always readily accepted, especially if it’s perceived as radical. Sometimes, the best plan is to introduce new concepts gradually, which is exactly what global engineering design consultancy Arup has done in Los Angeles. The company recently established a satellite office in the downtown area, to be closer to key clients, and to limit travelling time for workers. Planned as a touch-down space where people could work for several hours or days at a time, the office presented a unique design opportunity, says Arup principal Jon Phillips. “For several years, we have talked in the main LA office about the idea of activity-based working, whereby people are not hampered by a fixed desk structure. In the current arrangement, no single seating solution is ideal; people need to be able to collaborate at times, and work on a set of drawings which requires space. So we explored the activity-based working concept for the satellite office – it is already in use in Arup offices in Australia.” Arup collaborated closely with Zago Architecture throughout the entire design process, giving the architects a very open brief in terms of aesthetics. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/46535

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Award-winning Sydney mixed-use development with vertical gardens

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45954 Defined by its green walls and cantilevered heliostat reflectors, this large-scale development creates a new gateway to the Sydney CBD. Architect Mark Giles talks about how the design maximises connections with the wider community. It’s rare to acquire an entire city block for redevelopment, but when it does happen there’s an unparalleled opportunity for developers and architects to make a significant contribution to the fabric of a city. The former Chippendale United Brewery site on the western fringe of the Sydney CBD has been transformed by a masterplanned joint venture between Frasers Property Australia and Sekisui House Australia. But it wasn’t simply a case of throwing out the old for the new. While the developers of the 5.8ha site were looking to raise the benchmark for innovation and sustainability, they were also wanting to preserve key heritage elements and give something back to the city. One Central Park, designed by Ateliers Jean Nouvel, France and collaborating architectural firm PTW Architects, consequently reflects an holistic approach to urban design, says PTW architect Mark Giles. “This was an opportunity to reinvigorate an entire precinct in what is essentially a city of small villages. Connectivity was crucial – for so many years the old brewery site had been closed off to the public. We needed to open up the entire space, hence the idea of a park-like development that would provide through links along key axes. The site is close to Central Railway Station and two universities, so pedestrian traffic is high. “In designing the tall east tower, we took into account the height of the existing UTS building on the other side of road, where Broadway becomes Parramatta Road, a key arterial route. We chose to match this height so the two towers together create a gateway to the city from the west. There is also a strong urban edge to the development on this side. “In contrast, the residential nature of the Chippendale area to the south is reflected in an undulating facade treatment to the south of the two towers. There is also a liveliness to this elevation, with the balconies stepping in and out – this creates a softer facade.” One Central Park East tower, at 33 storeys, provides 383 apartments, while the 16-storey One Central Park West tower accommodates 240 apartments. Sky at Central Park, the precinct’s premium penthouse and sub-penthouse collection, comprises 38 residences in the top five levels of East tower. The development also boasts a five-level 16,000m2 shopping centre beneath a landscaped podium, a Sky Garden at Level 29, a 6400m2 landscaped public park at ground level – Chippendale Green – plus new public pocket parks. Thirty-three heritage elements have been retained and are being restored for adaptive re-use. These include a prominent tiled archway at Carlton Street, terraces and warehouses, three pubs, the Brewery Yard buildings and brick stack, and the original brewery administration building. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45960

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How to achieve a distinctive office interior design on a modest budget – offices for EightyOne

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45988 New offices for production company EightyOne show that a distinctive outcome doesn’t depend on a big budget. Designer Seb Bernhardt from Inside Design tells Trends editorial director Paul Taylor how he achieved it. Office interior design for EightyOne production company by Inside Design featuring untreated wood, exposed services and custom workstations. When design and production company EightyOne secured its heart-of-the-city premises, the creative team loved the setting but not the decor. Interiors team Inside Design was asked to strip out the white ceilings, neutral carpet and compartmentalised interiors and create something open, honest, and approachable in their place. Lead designer on the project Seb Bernhardt says inspiration for the new look grew in part from EightyOne’s own concept of introducing a central, freestanding feature wall in recycled timber. “Together, the newly exposed ceiling plant and levelled and honed concrete floor set the scene for a semi-industrial aesthetic, and a rustic timber wall in the centre of the office was a good fit with this approach,” says Bernhardt. “The idea was for the wall to capture peoples’ attention instantly, upon arrival. Sourced by EightyOne, the distressed Canadian Oregon timber was recycled from Christchurch, post-earthquake.” Complete with small side wings, one of which houses reference libraries, the wall conceals office utilities from the entry and reception area. It also offers a degree of privacy for the in-house photo studio in the open-plan space. The use of raw timber here inspired a similar material emphasis in other areas. A meeting space to the left of the entry is clad in macrocarpa. With three sides of this room finished in the same wood, it takes on a playful box-like quality, almost like a packing case, when viewed from outside. One wall of the ‘box’ extends back out into the entry corridor, offering an early glimpse of this rather unexpected rough-and-ready material. This helps to draw people forward. The meeting room doors extend the look. These are made from vertical wood planks. Set on sliders, the barn-style doors feature an antique operable latch with cogs, sourced by Inside Design. The rotated cogs indicate whether the room is vacant or in use. Exposed metal bracing on the doors is visible from within the space. An informal reception area beside the entry overlooks a kitchen unit with a similar box-like, timber treatment. The wood theme continues in this area, with a casual leaner table comprised of chunky industrial-look Kee Klamp components and a macrocarpa top. “To match these treatments we commissioned simple pine benches as workstations,” Bernhardt says. “These pared-back desks were produced by Kerry Hart. However, this desking solution left nowhere to conceal computer cabling, so we introduced metal floor tread plates at the side of each desk – again, in line with the semi-industrial look.” Another informal desk area housing data analytics company Dot Loves Data and photographer Richard Bran has a similar aesthetic. However, if much of the fit-out has a raw, untreated appearance, a contrast awaits clients inside the meeting room. This was another area where the EightyOne staff had a significant input. They wanted to create a refined, but homely, contrasting environment in this room, the only enclosable space in the design. Co-owners and directors of EightyOne, Carlos Constable and Matt West, say their team sourced the pre-loved furniture pieces for the shabby chic environment that resembles a lounge in a home. Besides being cosy, the wickerwork settee, rolled-arm sofa, classic coffee table and traditional open fireplace are in juxtaposition with the exposed timber on one wall and the braced barn doors. From the reception space, complete with pinball machine, moose head, large wall blackboard and well-stocked bar, to the comfortable and casual feel of the meeting room, EightyOne’s interior is designed to exude a youthful dynamic, and to put clients immediately at ease. Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45989

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Post-earthquake commercial building in Christchurch on triangular site

Read the full article at: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45975 Strange’s building in Christchurch, by Sheppard & Rout Architects, has an exposed steel structure, coloured glass fins and a vibrant laneway with bars and cafés. Architect Jasper van der Lingen talks about the influence of the earthquakes on the building design. As the first permanent buildings to be completed in the former Christchurch CBD Red Zone, the Strange’s and Glendenning Hill buildings have caught the eye of designers, developers and locals alike. Architect Jasper van der Lingen of Sheppard and Rout Architects says this is not surprising, as everyone has been waiting with interest to see what forms new CBD buildings will take in the post-earthquake reconstruction. “We were the first cab off the rank, so to speak, so we spent considerable time discussing this very issue with the owner, KPI Rothschild Property Group,” van der Lingen says. “The city was still experiencing large aftershocks, but the owner was adamant the damaged heritage building should be replaced as soon as possible. We had considerable debate and discussion about the design, and it became clear that the buildings needed to look strong. Being able to see the structure of a building is a visual reassurance that it will withstand future earthquakes.” Van der Lingen says the same owner had only recently strengthened the historic 1882 Bonnington brick and stone building that adjoined the original Strange’s building, so it survived the quake. The team realised it could play a crucial role in the design, creating a raw, textural backdrop to a new laneway and courtyard that would be home to a number of cafés and bars. “The Christchurch City Council is encouraging such mixed-use developments and laneways as part of the urban blueprint for the city. It is all about revitalising the city and making it a lot more liveable and friendly.” “For the new Strange’s and Glendenning buildings, we chose to express the steel framework on the outside of the building, so the bones and structure are clearly visible – the strength can be seen at a glance. The two buildings are seismically separate, however, and the Glendenning building has a Lichfield Street address.” Sheppard and Rout Architects also created a large egg-shaped cylindrical concrete core, which provides the main structural support for the Strange’s building. The form of the cylinder, which features concrete half a metre thick, is exposed on all levels, and pops out the top, so it can be glimpsed from many areas. “The oval shape is one of the strongest forms in nature,” says van der Lingen. “The client wanted a building that would last forever. It wasn’t enough to just meet earthquake codes – we needed to surpass them, so this building is built to IL4 level, which is usually restricted to emergency facilities. This means the building is built to a standard that is 188% of the earthquake code for Christchurch.” Video: http://trendsideas.com/#/search/45976

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