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To balance a colourful tropical landscape, thedesigner of this interior chose a muted chessboard palette, with touches of creative colour

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When a home has large windows with extensive landscaped gardens as the backdrop, the colours and design of the interior need to complement the exterior, but diffuse brightness.

IMA Interiors managing director Isabelle Miaja says shades from both ends of the colour spectrum were employed to achieve the balance in this home.

"We used neutral colours for the flooring and prominent furniture, with darker earthy colours for secondary furniture and accessories. The natural green in the exterior contributes the most vibrant colour to the design."

While the interior of the residence is unmistakably modern, Miaja says it is not sterile or minimalist.

"We sought uncommon but high-quality designer furniture and added varied textures and earthy muted tones to give it a luxury feeling. The homeowners' addition of quirky objects and art completed each room and gave the modern interior an unconventional appeal."

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Portuguese limestone and Tasmanian oak were used as the main floor finishes. Miaja says these are ideal for the tropical heat of the home's location, and are light and luxurious looking.

Coffered ceilings are prevalent throughout the house. They add interest, and like the patterned and textured carpets, break up the expanse of white.

She says feature walls with dark wooden finishes also help to temper the white colour scheme.

Stainless steel is a recurring material in fittings, wall features and artwork. As well as being modern, the steel is sturdy enough to raise furniture off the ground, giving the impression of buoyancy.

Miaja says warm earthy tones in furnishings, including chocolate, gold and olive, weigh down the floating furniture.

"The punches of dark in the cushions and chairs draw the eye to the furniture, which in a large, intimidating room can help create a more inviting atmosphere."

This dark and light colour palette is continued in the TV room, but is muted and informal. More vibrant colours, such as mauve, navy and orange are seen in the accessories. Streaks of silver on the two-toned wooden wall cabinet create a functional artwork.

Tasmanian oak is well utilised in the master bedroom, where it features on the floor, bed base and headboard.

Miaja says that the bed is raised and given prominence by the creation of a platform using a ribbed sisal rug between the base and floor.

"The steel square border extended from the headboard creates another focal point and frames the bed, without overburdening it, as a heavy four-way bed frame might have done. The drop down A-frame soffit encloses the space," she says.

Moreover, it weighs down the bed, which seems to hover, due to its light steel blue slipper-satin bedding, protruding side tables and translucent glass lamps.

The same oak features in the custom-designed cabinetry in the master bathroom. The flooring and wall covering is Volakas marble and the fittings and vanity tops are by Phillipe Starck.

First published date: 14 May 2007

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Credit List

Architect K. Chartered Architects
Interior designer IMA Interiors (Singapore)
Main contractor WTK Builder
Floor Portuguese limestone by Polystone; Tasmanian oak by Nam Huat Tiling
Wall tiles Nam Huat Tiling and Panelling
Wallpaper coverings Goodrich Global
Lighting Million Lighting Company
Living and dining room furniture Space
Bedroom furniture and upholstery Xtra Designs
Curtains DE Workshop
Bathroom fittings Phillipe Starck
Photography by Tim Nolan