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Minimalist highlights

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The streamlined styling of this modernist home is enhanced by Italian-designed lighting from Fabbian

Minimalist highlights

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When illuminating a minimalist interior, careful lighting selection is important. With fewer decorative elements in a clean-lined, contemporary décor, the light fixtures themselves become integral design features.

In addition to this, the type of illumination you choose has a greater impact on the overall mood of each space, says Julia Giacomelli, director of lighting company F Fabbian.

The modernist home shown on these pages is an example of a successful lighting selection. The living room features discreet ceiling-mounted Architectural fittings. These multi-directional lights highlight artwork on the walls, and can be dimmed to provide a subtle glow for evening entertaining.

In the adjoining kitchen, a Sospesa pendant light hangs above the island benchtop. Its defined, geometrical shape and simple design complement the modern styling and white walls of the kitchen. Designed and manufactured by Italian company Fabbian, the Sospesa pendant comprises a transparent, rectangular panel of glass. The electrical circuit runs through this glass to form a pattern of intersecting lines leading to each lighting point.

The hallway features Cubetto wall lights, also made by Fabbian. Their cube-shaped glass shades have opaque interiors and metallised grey frames. Cubetto is available in several models including fixed and mobile pendants, table and floor lamps and ceiling-mounted lights. Each can accommodate either halogen or incandescent bulbs.

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"Hallway lighting should be warm and welcoming," says Giacomelli. "By illuminating both the walls and the floor at the same time, it's possible to create a sense of space in what is usually a relatively confined area."

For further details, contact F Fabbian Lighting, 66B Mt Eden Rd, Mt Eden, Auckland, phone (09) 630 6880. Email: sales@fabbian.co.nz.

First published date: 23 August 2004

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